Introduction

Three 3D graphic worlds have been developed to explain HERE stories: a stylized real world in day and night view, and a data world. The data world specifically visualizes the technology beneath the surface which is largely invisible during the real world views.

Guidelines

1. Real world day view.

The HERE real world view is stylized, simulated daytime scene, using bright lighting, light colors and gradients and it's used to show HERE products and services in the real world. In general, scenes should have a relatively high level of realism.

Example of real world daytime view.

Real world day view principles.

1. Scene styling.
The overall scene uses light gray smooth, slightly reflective surfaces. Roads, barriers and other street elements are based on this light gray palette.  Buildings and scenery in the real world day view  use a mix of light gray to aqua gradients instead, to bring life to the scene.

2. Lighting.
Scene lighting is set up to look natural: warm daylight with slight shadowing (balanced light, not dramatic). Typically there is one light source. The sky colors are created to look harmonious with the rest of the scene (see 7. buildings and scenery). The colors can be adjusted to reflect weather conditions, time of day.

3. Line style.
Linear accents are limited only to vehicles (see 14. Vehicle line style).

4. Focal blur.
In the real world daytime view, there is a minimal focal blur at the edge of the camera.

5. Details.
The most important objects in a scene (e.g. vehicle) have the most amount of detail. Detail should only be used when close to viewpoint. Background objects (e.g. buildings) have little  complexity.

6. Scene transparency.
Important objects in the data world become transparent when in close proximity.

7. Data grid.
A subtle overhead box-grid is used to create a sense of depth in animation, which should react to camera movement.

8. Route style.
Route line should be based on HERE aqua and should be slightly brightened or darkened to ensure maximum visibility on the road surface.

9. Highlights.
The default vehicle highlight color is HERE aqua. It is similarly brightened or darkened like the route style. Highlights gently rotate clockwise. When sending or receiving data, vehicle highlights can change (e.g. to a dashed or alert color).

 

When sending or receiving data, vehicle highlights can change (e.g. to a dashed or alert color.

10. Secondary colors.
3D Yellow (HEX#ECFF00) and HERE orange are used to give objects additional standout. HERE yellow is an attention color whereas HERE orange shows a hazard or alert. 

11. Additional colors.
In general, colors other than the HERE primary and secondary colors should not be used. However, where necessary, important objects (such as brake lights or traffic lights) should be in their original color.

12. Vehicle coloration.
Transparent aqua is used on windows and special surfaces (e.g. solar panel). In-vehicle view should not feature aqua windows. Vehicle coloration is light gray, depending on the vehicle shape or type and the surfaces available.

13. Vehicle interior.
The vehicle interior coloration is a mid-gray tone with small aqua highlights where necessary e.g. RPM counter, speedometer etc. A minimal blur appears on the speedometer and RPM counter also.

14. Vehicle line style.
In the real world day view,  vehicles use bold white lines on prominent edges for standout. The line usage depends on the vehicle shape or type and the surfaces available.

15. Additional vehicles.
Other important vehicles in scenes follow the same rules as our principle vehicle (e.g. same line styles and coloring). Unimportant vehicles have reduced detail levels with no linework and no aqua panels to create a clear distinction and centralized focus.

16. Other scene objects.
Other details and objects can be used to bring in a level of realism, e.g. realistic tree and building forms.

17. Data overlays.
In the CGI real world, data overlay containers are usually shown on light backgrounds which is why white and HERE aqua are preferred container colors. Gray is avoided.

 

18. Data overlays as object highlights.
The alert colours of 3D yellow and HERE orange can be used as an overlay to highlight objects. Highlighted objects should be masked with the highlight color and should use transparency and gradient subtly to create a  photographic look.

2. Real world nighttime view.

Example of real world nighttime view.

Real world nighttime view principles.
HERE real world nighttime view principles a are based on the look of the real world day time view with the following specific differences:

1. Scene styling.
Textures and coloration are based on the real world day view style but are darkened to create a nighttime look.

2. Lighting.
There is a mixture of artificial and natural lighting in the night time view. The sky and street lighting have a warm look. Headlights are a bright white light.

3. Focal blur.
In the real world night time view, there is a minimal focal blur at the edge of the camera.

4. Vehicle coloration.
The gray of the car is darkened to harmonize with the night real world time view world look. Darker aqua tones are used, e.g. windows.

3. Data world view.

The data world view communicates the underlying level of data and technical information in a scene.

Example of data world view.

Data world view principles.

1. Scene styling.
The scene has an overall aqua-dark gray look. Color and textures appear in darker aqua hues. Scene lighting is dark. Data world lighting does not reflect natural lighting.

2. Lighting.
Overall, the 3D world is based on shades of dark gray from the HERE color palette. An aqua glow is used to highlight the focus of the scene. The sky is a dark aqua gradient blending into dark gray. Buildings & streets have a slight reflection.

3. Line style.
Everything in the data world has an aqua outline. They are prominent and used to highlight objects. Lines are different weights. depending on surfaces.

4. Focal blur.
The data world view has heavy blur. The most important objects in a scene (e.g. vehicle) are in sharp focus, while background elements appear blurred out. This concentrates the focus for clear storytelling and provides added differentiation to the real world nighttime view.

5. Details.
The most important objects in a scene (e.g. vehicle) have the most amount of detail. Detail should only be used when close to viewpoint. Background objects (e.g. buildings) have little  complexity.

6. Scene transparency.
Important objects in the data world become transparent when in close proximity.

7. Data grid.
A subtle overhead box-grid is used to create a sense of depth in animation, which should react to camera movement.

8. Route style.
Route line should be based on HERE aqua and should be slightly brightened or darkened to ensure maximum visibility on the road surface.

9. Highlights.
The default vehicle highlight color is HERE aqua. It is similarly brightened or darkened like the route style.

 

Highlights gently rotate clockwise. When sending or receiving data, vehicle highlights can change (e.g. to a dashed or alert color.

10. Dot matrix.
Texture dot matrix covers surfaces and is more pronouced closer to viewpoint. Size of dots changes depending on size and shape of surface,
e.g. smaller dots on smaller areas. It is used on buidlings, streets, barriers, etc.

11. Vehicle line style.
Vehicles use bold white lines on prominent edges for standout and feature a fine aqua grid allover. The line usage depends on the vehicle shape or type and the surfaces available. Linework is only used on the vehicle exterior.

12. Vehicle interior.
In the data world, the vehicle interior coloration is a mid-gray tone. The dashboard and steering wheel have a soft aqua colored light reflection to give a little life to harmonize with the scene. RPM counter, speedometer etc have a minimal blur and small aqua highlights where necessary.

13. Vehicle coloration.
Transparent aqua is used on windows and special surfaces (e.g. solar panel). In-vehicle view should not feature aqua windows.

Vehicle coloration is typically mid gray to highlight grid and linework. This coloring depends on the vehicle shape or type and the surfaces available.

14. Primary colors.
In general, colors should be based on shades of the HERE primary color palette.

15. Secondary colors.
3D Yellow (HEX#ECFF00) and HERE orange are used to give objects additional standout. 3D yellow is an attention color whereas HERE orange shows a hazard or alert.

16. Additional colors.
In general, colors other than the HERE primary and secondary colors should not be used. However, where necessary, important objects (such as brake lights or traffic lights) should be in their original color.

17. Additional vehicles.
Other important vehicles in scenes follow the same rules as our principle vehicle (e.g. same line styles and coloring). Unimportant vehicles have reduced detail levels with no linework and no aqua panels to create a clear distinction and centralized focus.

18. Data effects.
Additional effects may be used in the data world to dial up the tech feel, e.g. coordinates can be used in this manner. Data effects should be displayed in 3D yellow (HEX#ECFF00).

19. Other scene objects.
Other details and objects can be used to bring in a level of realism, e.g. realistic tree and building forms.

20. Data overlays.
In the data world view, data overlay containers are usually shown on dark backgrounds which is why HERE dark gray, HERE aqua and HERE dark aqua are the preferred container colors. White is usually avoided.

21. Data overlays as object highlights.
The alert colours of 3D yellow and HERE orange can be used as an overlay to highlight objects. Highlighted objects should be masked with the highlight color. Highlights should avoid being completely solid and should use transparency and gradient subtly to create a more photographic look.

Animation

Movement.
Every movement should feel natural. Objects don’t just go from zero to one hundred but accelerate and decelerate.

Animation curve.
Outgoing Velocity: 50 %
Incoming Velocity: 80 %

 

Data overlay animation.
The overlays appear in a continuous motion. The animation curve is applied on the whole animation to create a seamless motion.

 

Data overlays on 3D imagery.
On 3D imagery overlays should have a subtle movement after they appear to give a dynamic feel.

 

Perspective and data overlays.
In 3D scenes, the overlays are orientated in the 3D space according to the camera perspective. The data overlays move according to the objects they belong to.

 

Lines.
We always start with the line as our first element to animate in.

Animation of containers with line.
The line always comes in first. After that the container emerges out of the line.

 

Animation of modules without line.
If the overlay has no lines it animates in like the container. The module has a subtle upwards movement.

 

Timing.

Keep animations short so viewers don’t have to wait for elements to appear. The animation should always have a continuous flow. If you have elements animating in one of another, an overlap in the animation helps to keep the flow of the animation going.

Data overlay animation.
Objects shouldn’t be animated simultaneously but one after another
to help the viewer take in information.

 

Layers.

The data overlays consist ofmultiple elements. To show layers of information, animate these elements in one after another.

Data overlay animation.
Showing the layers one after another helps the viewer comprehend the information. Main elements appear with the container or module, smaller elements of infographics animate in afterwards.

Scanned or activated objects.

Scanned or activated objects within the 3D scene are displayed with a yellow attention mask.

Scanned objects in focus.
Objects such as street lights, road signs etc. are highlighted with a yellow flash. When there are multiple consecutive elements, the flash can be animated with the perspective of the scene.

 

Scanned objects in motion.
Objects such as street barriers are highlighted with an animation that follows the flow of the camera movement in perspective. The yellow mask is displayed with a gradient at the start and the end to make the highlighted area more subtle.

 

Activated objects.
Objects can flash or blink if they are active to help explain a story.

 

Invisible elements.
Elements such as data streams use blur and fade in and out to create a subtle effect.

 

Transitions.

The transition from real world to data world happens within a quick fade. The transition should be fluid and seamless. 

Transition between worlds.
Data details such as lines fade in first, followed by the rest of the scene.
Keep the transition between 1 and 2 seconds long.
Data overlays also change with a fade in from real world to data world.

 

Resources

3D / CGI files package

If you need 3D or CGI graphics developed, please work with your Activation Manager and the guidelines above to create what is right for your project. For approval on your project and if you need additional assistance, contact brand@here.com